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Archive for August, 2010

I spent last week at the Agile 2010 Conference. It was my first time at a conference this size; I definitely found it interesting and there were some thought provoking sessions - but there weren’t many deeply technical talks. As others have asked, what happened to the programmers?

Bob Martin wrote that

Programmers started the agile movement to get closer to customers not project managers

He also commented on how few talks were about programming

< 10% of the talks at #agile2010 are about programming. Is programming really < 10% of Agile?

People have already commented on how cost is a factor in attending a conference like this – especially for those of us outside the US who have expensive flights to contend with, too. This is certainly a factor, but I wonder if this is the real problem?

Do developers attend a conference like Agile 2010 to improve their craft? How much can you cover in a 90 minute session? Sure, you can get an introduction to a new topic – but how much detail can you get into? Isn’t learning the craft fundamentally a practical task? You need hands on experience and feedback to really learn. In a short session with a 100+ people are you actually gonna improve your craft?

Take TDD as an arbitrary example. The basic idea can be explained fairly quickly. A 90 minute session can give you a good introduction and some hands on experience – but to really grok the idea, to really see the benefit, you need to see it applied to the real world and take it back to the day job. I think the same applies to any technical talk – if its interesting enough to be challenging, 90 minutes isn’t going to do it justice.

This is exacerbated by agile being such a broad church; there were developers specialising in Java, C#, Ruby and a host of other languages. Its difficult to pitch a technical talk that’s challenging and interesting that doesn’t turn off the majority of developers that don’t use your chosen language.

That’s not to say a conference like Agile 2010 isn’t valuable, and I’m intrigued to see where XP Universe 2011 gets to. However, I think the work that Jason Gorman is doing on Software Craftsmanship, for example, is a more successful format for technical learning – but this is focused clearly on the technical, rather than improving our software delivery process.

Isn’t the problem that Agile isn’t about programming? It is – or at least has become - management science. Agile is a way of managing software projects, of structuring organisations, of engaging with customers – aiming to deliver incremental value as quickly as possible. Nothing in this dictates technical practices or technologies. Sure, XP has some things to say about practices; but scrum, lean, kanban et al are much more about the processes and principles than specific technical approaches.

Aren’t the biggest problems with making our workplaces more agile – and in fact the biggest problems in software engineering in general –  management ones, not development ones? Its pretty rare to find a developer that tells you TDD is bad, that refactoring makes code worse, that continuous integration is a waste of time, that OOD leads to worse software. But its pretty common to find customers that want the moon on a stick, and want it yesterday; managers that value individual efficiency over team effectiveness, that create distinct functional teams and hinder communication.

There is always more for us to learn; we’re improving our craft all the time. But I don’t believe the biggest problems in software are the developers. Its more common for a developer to complain about the number of meetings they’re asked to attend, than the standard of code written by their peers.

Peers can be educated, crap management abides.

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