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Posts Tagged ‘quality’

Software is taking over the world. Arguably software has already taken over the world. The trouble is: software is all shit – and it’s all your fault.

I had one of those seconds-from-flinging-something-heavy-through-my-tv days yesterday: I really have had it with crappy software. First, I decided to relax and catch up with last week’s Have I Got News For You on BBC iPlayer. Unfortunately, for some unfathomable reason, the XBox iPlayer app has become shit in recent months. Last night, it played 0.5 seconds of the show and hung. Network traffic was still flying by, but none of it was appearing on my TV. Fine, I switched to using iPlayer on my laptop – at least that normally works.

Afterwards I decided to watch another of the (excellent, by the way) American remake of House of Cards on Netflix. First, my router had got its knickers in a twist and switched the VPN so Netflix thought I was in the US, so all of my recently watched had disappeared. Boot up laptop (again), login to admin page on the router, fiddle with settings, reboot, reboot XBox, login again: there we go, UK Netflix is back, I can finally watch House of Cards. Except now the TV has crashed and refuses to decode the HDCP signal from the XBox. Reboot TV: no. Reboot xbox, again. Yes! We have signal!

I sat back and started watching. I have to get up, three times, because the volume is quieter than a quiet thing on quiet day in quiet land. Eventually it was so damned quiet I manage to miss some dialog, so I get to use the, occasionally awesome, XBox kinect voice control feature that saves me scrabbling to find the controller: “xbox rewind”. Excellent, it starts rewinding. “xbox stop”. “XBOX, STOP!” “Oh for fuck’s fucking sake xbox, fucking stop you fucking retarded demon, STOP!”. Find the controller. Wait for it to boot up. Now the Netflix app has resumed its entirely random bug where I lose all the on screen navigation controls, so I have to guess which combination of up, down, A, A, B, up, down stops the bloody rewind and not the one that invokes the super Netflix boss level. Eventually the button mashing exits Netflix, not what I intended but at least it’s stopped rewinding. I launch Netflix again. This time the on screen controls work. Woohoo! Now volume has switched back to slightly louder than a jet engine piped directly against your ear drum, so I jump up and turn the volume down before it wakes my little boy up.

By now, I’m in no mood for political intrigue – killing every developer that was involved in any of the pieces of software that have ruined my mood and my evening, quite gladly: pass me the knife, I’m happy to relieve each them of their useless lives and hopelessly misapplied careers.

The trouble is: it’s not their fault. All software is shit. As software takes over more and more of my life I realise: it’s not getting any better. My phone crashes, my TV crashes, my hi-fi crashes. My sat nav gets lost and my car needs a BIOS upgrade. This is all before I get to work and get to use any actual computers. Actual computers that I actually hate.

Every step of every day, software is pissing me off. And you know what? It’s only going to get worse. As software invades more and more of our lives our complete inability to create decent, stable software is becoming a plague. The future will be dominated by people swearing at every little computer they come into contact with. In our bright software future where everything is digital and we’re constantly plugged into the metaverse I will spend my entire life swearing at it for being so unutterably, unnecessarily shit.

You know what else? As software developers: it’s all our fault.

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A while back I read Making Software – it made me disappointed at the state of academic research into the practice of developing software. I just read Leprechauns of Software Engineering which made me angry about the state of academic research.

Laurent provides a great critique of some of the leprechauns of our industry and why we believe in them. But it just highlighted to me how little we really know about what works in software development. Our industry is driven by fashion because nobody has any objective measure on what works and what doesn’t. Some people love comparing software to the medical profession, to torture the analogy a bit – I think today we’re in the blood letting and leeches phase of medical science. We don’t really know what works, but we have all sorts of strange rituals to do it better.

Rituals

Rituals? What rituals? We’re professional software developers!

But of course, we all get together every morning for a quick status update. Naturally we answer the three questions strictly, any deviations are off-topic. We stand up to keep the meeting short, obviously. And we all stand round the hallowed scrum kanban board.

But rituals? What rituals?

Do we know if stand ups are effective? Do we know if scrum is effective? Do we even know if TDD works?

Measuring is Hard

Not everything that can be measured matters; not everything that matters can be measured

I think we have a fundamental problem when it comes to analysing what works and what doesn’t. As a developer there are two things I ultimately need to know about any practice/tool/methodology:

  1. Does it get the job done faster?
  2. Does it result in less bugs / lower maintenance cost?

This boils down to measuring productivity and defects.

Productivity

Does TDD make developers more productive? Are developers more productive in Ruby or Java? Is pairing productive?

These are some fascinating questions that, if we had objective, repeatable answers to would have a massive impact on our industry. Imagine being able to dismiss all the non-TDD doing, non-pairing Java developers as being an unproductive waste of space! Imagine if there was scientific proof! We could finally end the language wars once and for all.

But how can you measure productivity? By lines of code? Don’t make me laugh. By story points? Not likely. Function points? Now I know you’re smoking crack. As Ben argues, there’s no such thing as productivity.

The trouble is, if we can’t measure productivity – it’s impossible to compare whether doing something has an impact on whether you get the job done faster or not. This isn’t just an idle problem – I think it fundamentally makes research into software engineering practices impossible.

It makes it impossible to answer these basic questions. It leaves us open to fashion, to whimsy and to consultants.

Quality

Does TDD help increase quality? What about code reviews? Just how much should you invest in quality?

Again, there are some fundamental questions that we cannot answer without measuring quality. But how can you measure quality? Is it a bug or a feature? Is it a user error or a requirements error? How many bugs? Is an error in a third party library that breaks several pages of your website one bug or dozens? If we can’t agree what a defect is or even how to count them how can we ever measure quality?

Subjective Measures

Maybe there are some subjective measures we could adopt. For example, perhaps I could monitor the number of emails to support. That’s a measure of software quality. It’s rather broad, but if software quality increases, the number of emails should decrease. However, social factors could so easily dwarf any actual improvement. For example, if users keep reporting software crashes and are told by the developers “yeah, we know”. Do you keep reporting it? Or just accept it and get on with your life? The trouble is, the lack of customer complaints doesn’t indicate the presence of quality.

What To Do?

What do we do? Do we just give up and adopt the latest fashion hoping that this time it will solve all our problems?

I think we need to gather data. We need to gather lots of data. I’d like to see thousands of dev teams across the world gathering statistics on their development process. Maybe out of a mass of data we can start to see some general patterns and begin to have some scientific basis for what we do.

What to measure? Everything! Anything and everything. The only constraint is we have to agree on how to measure it. Since everything in life is fundamentally a problem of lack of code, maybe we need a tool to help measure our development process? E.g. a tool to measure how long I spend in my IDE, how long I spend testing. How many tests I write; how often I run them; how often I commit to version control etc etc. These all provide detailed telemetry on our development process – perhaps out of this mass of data we can find some interesting patterns to help guide us all towards building software better.

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