Dependency injection with PostSharp

I don’t really like IoC containers. Or rather, I don’t like the crappy code people write when they’re given an IoC container. Before you know it you have NounVerbers everywhere, a million dependencies and no decent domain model. Dependencies should really be external to your application; everything outside of the core domain model that your application represents.

  • A web service? That’s a dependency
  • A database? Yup
  • A message queue? Definitely a dependency
  • A scheduler or thread pool? Yup
  • Any NounVerber (PriceCalculator, StockFetcher, BasketFactory, VatCalculator) no! Not a dependency. Stop it. They’re all part of your core business domain and are actually methods on a class. If you can’t write Price.Calculate() or Stock.Fetch() or new Basket() or Vat.Calculate() then fix your domain model first before you go hurting yourself with an IoC container

A while back I described a very simple, hand-rolled approach to dependency injection. But if we wave a little PostSharp magic we can improve on that basic idea. All the source code for this is available on github.

It works like this: if we have a dependency, say an AuthService, we declare an interface that business objects can implement to request that they have the dependency injected into them. In this case, IRequireAuthService.

class User : IRequireAuthService
{
  public IAuthService AuthService { set; private get; }

We create a DependencyInjector that can set these properties:

public void InjectDependencies(object instance)
{
  if (instance is IRequireAuthService)
    ((IRequireAuthService)instance).AuthService = AuthService;
    ...
}

This might not be the prettiest method – you’ll end up with an if…is IRequire… line for each dependency you can inject. But this provides a certain amount of friction. While it is easy to add new dependencies, developers are discouraged from doing it. This small amount of friction massively limits the unchecked growth of dependencies so prevalent with IoC containers. This friction is why I prefer the hand-rolled approach to off-the-shelf IoC containers.

So how do we trigger the dependency injector to do what it has to do? This is where some PostSharp magic comes in. We declare an attribute to use on the constructor:

  [InjectDependencies]
  public User(string id)

Via the magic of PostSharp aspect weaving this attribute causes some code to be executed before the constructor. This attribute is simply defined as:

public sealed override void OnEntry(MethodExecutionArgs args)
{
  DependencyInjector.CurrentInjector.InjectDependencies(args.Instance);
  base.OnEntry(args);
}

And that’s it – PostSharp weaves this method before each constructor with the [InjectDependencies] attribute. We get the current dependency injector and pass in the object instance (i.e. the newly created User instance) to have dependencies injected into it. Just like that we have a very simple dependency injector. Even better all this aspect weaving magic is available with the express (free!) edition of PostSharp.

Taking it Further

There are a couple of obvious extensions to this. You can create a TestDependencyInjector so that your unit tests can provide their own (mock) implementations of dependencies. This can also include standard (stub) implementations of some dependencies. E.g. a dependency that manages cross-thread scheduling can be replaced by an immediate (synchronous) implementation for unit tests to ensure that unit tests are single-threaded and repeatable.

Secondly, the DependencyInjector uses a ThreadLocal to store the current dependency injector. If you use background threads and want dependency injection to work there, you need a way of pushing the dependency injector onto the background thread. This generally means wrapping thread spawning code (which will itself be a dependency). You’ll want to wrap any threading code anyway to make it unit-testable.

Compile Time Checks

Finally, the most common failure mode we encountered with this was people forgetting to put [InjectDependencies] on the constructor. This means you get nulls at runtime, instead of dependencies. With a bit more PostSharp magic (this brand of magic requires the paid-for version, though) we can stop that, too. First, we change each IRequire to use a new attribute that indicates it manages injection of a dependency:

[Dependency]
public interface IRequireAuthService
{
  IAuthService AuthService { set; }
}

We configure this attribute to be inherited to all implementation classes – so all business objects that require auth service get the behaviour – then we define a compile time check to verify that the constructors have [InjectDependencies] defined:

public override bool CompileTimeValidate(System.Reflection.MethodBase method)
{
  if (!method.CustomAttributes.Any(a => a.AttributeType == typeof(InjectDependenciesAttribute)))
  {
    Message.Write(SeverityType.Error, "InjectDependences", "No [InjectDependencies] declared on " + method.DeclaringType.FullName + "." + method.Name, method);
    return false;
  }
  return base.CompileTimeValidate(method);
}

This compile time check now makes the build fail if I ever declare a class IRequireAuthService without adding [InjectDependencies] onto the class’ constructor.

Simple, hand-rolled dependency injection with compile time validation thanks to PostSharp!

 

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