How many builds?

I’m always amazed at the seemingly high pain threshold .net developers have when it comes to tooling. I’ve written before about the poor state of tooling in .net, but just recently I hit another example of poor tooling that infuriates me: I have too many builds, and they don’t agree whether my code compiles.

One of the first things that struck me when starting to develop on .net was that compiling code was still a thing. An actual step that had to be thought about. Incremental compilers in Eclipse and the like have been around for ages – to the point where, generally, Java developers don’t actually have to instruct their IDE to compile code for them. But in Visual Studio? Oh it’s definitely necessary. And time consuming. Oh my god is it slow. Ok, maybe not as slow as Scala. But still unbelievably slow when you’re used to working at the speed of thought.

Another consequence of the closed, Microsoft way of doing things is that tools can’t share the compiler’s work. So ReSharper have implemented their own compiler, effectively. It incrementally parses source code and finds compiler errors. Sometimes it even agrees with the Visual Studio build. But all too often it doesn’t. From the spurious not-actually-an-error that I have to continually instruct ReSharper to ignore; to the warnings-as-errors build failures that ReSharper doesn’t warn me about; to the random why-does-ReSharper-not-know-about-that-NuGet-package-errors.

This can be infuriating when refactoring. E.g. if an automated refactor leaves a variable unused, I will now have a compiler warning; since all my projects run with warnings-as-errors switched on, this will fail the build. But ReSharper doesn’t know that. So I apply the refactoring, code & tests are green: commit. Push. Boom! CI is red. But it was an automated refactor for chrissakes, how’ve I broken the build?!

I also use NCrunch, an automated test runner for Visual Studio (like Infinitest in the Java world). NCrunch is awesome, by the way; better even than the continuous test runner in ReSharper 10. If you’ve never used a continuous test runner and think you’re doing TDD, sort your life out and setup Infinitest or NCrunch. It doesn’t just automate pressing the shortcut key to run all your tests. Well, actually that is exactly what it does – but the impact it has on your workflow is so much more than that. When you can type a few characters, look at the test output and see what happened you get instant feedback. This difference in degree changes the way you write code and makes it so much easier to do TDD.

Anyway I digress – NCrunch, because Microsoft, can’t use the result of the compile that Visual Studio does. So it does its own. It launches MSBuild in the background, continually re-compiling your code. This is not exactly kind on your CPU. It also introduces inconsistencies. Because NCrunch is running a slightly different MSBuild on each project to the build VisualStudio does you get subtly different results sometimes; which is different again from ReSharper with its own compiler that isn’t even using MSBuild. I now have three builds. Three compilers. It is honestly a miracle when they all agree that my code compiles.

An all-too-typical dev cycle becomes:

  • Write test
  • ReSharper is happy
  • NCrunch build is failing, force reload NCrunch project
  • NCrunch builds, test fails
  • Make test pass
  • Try to run app
  • VisualStudio build fails
  • Fix NuGet problems
  • NCrunch build is now failing
  • Force NCrunch to reload at least one project again
  • Force VisualStudio to rebuild the project
  • Then the solution
  • Run app to sanity check change
  • ReSharper now shows error
  • Re-ignore perennial ReSharper non-error
  • All three compilers agree, quick: commit!

Normally then the build fails in CI because I still screwed up the NuGet packages.

Then recently, as if this wasn’t already one of the outer circles of hell. The CI build was failing for a bizarre reason. We have a command line script which applies the same build steps that CI runs, so I thought I’d run that to replicate the problem. Unfortunately the command line build was failing on my machine for a spectacularly spurious reason that was different again than the failure in CI. Great. I now have five builds which don’t all agree on whether my code compiles.

Do you really hate computers? Do you wish you had more reasons to defenestrate every last one of them? Have you considered a career in software development?

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Dogma Driven Development

We really are an arrogant, opinionated bunch, aren’t we? We work in an industry where there aren’t any right answers. We pretend what we do is computer “science”. When in reality, its more art than science. It certainly isn’t engineering. Engineering suggests an underlying physics, mathematical models of how the world works. Is there a mathematical model of how to build software at scale? No. Do we understand the difference between what makes good software and bad software? No. Are there papers with published proofs of whether this idea or that idea has any observable difference on written software, as practised by companies the world over? No. It turns out this is a difficult field: software is weird stuff. And yet we work in an industry full of close-minded people, convinced that their way is The One True Way. It’s not science, its basically art. Our industry is dominated by fashion.

Which language we work in is fashion: should we use Ruby, or Node.js or maybe Clojure. Hey Go seems pretty cool. By which I mean “I read about it on the internet, and I’d quite like to put it on my CV so can I please f*** up your million pound project in a big experiment of whether I can figure out all the nuances of the language faster than the project can de-rail?”

If it’s not the language we’re using, its architectural patterns. The dogma attached to REST. Jesus H Christ. It’s just a bunch of HTTP requests, no need to get so picky! For a while it was SOA. Then that became the old legacy thing, so now it’s all micro-services, which are totally different. Definitely. I read it on the internet, it must be true.

Everyone has their opinions. Christ, we’ve got our opinions. Thousands of blogs and wankers on twitter telling you what they think about the world (exactly like this one) As if one person’s observations are useful for anything more than being able to replicate their past success, should you ever by mistake find yourself on their timeline from about six weeks ago.

For example: I wrote a post recently about pairing, and some fine specimen of internet based humanity felt the need to tell me that people who need to pair are an embarrassment to the profession, that we should find another line of work. Hahaha I know, don’t read the comments. Especially when it’s in reply to something you wrote. But seriously now, is it necessary to share your close minded ignorance with the world?

I shouldn’t get worked up about some asshat on the internet. But it’s not just some asshat on the internet. There are hundreds of thousands of these asshats with their closed minds and dogmatic views on the world. And not just asshats spouting off on the internet, but getting paid to build the software that increasingly runs all our lives. When will we admit that we have no idea what we’re doing. The only way to get better is to learn as many tools and techniques as we can and hopefully, along the way, we’ll learn when to apply which techniques and when not to.

For example, I’ve worked with some people that don’t get TDD. Ok, fine – some people just aren’t “test infected”. And a couple of guys that really would rather gut me and fry my liver for dinner than pair with me. Do I feel the need to evangelise to them as though I’ve just found God? No. Does it offend me that they don’t follow my religion? No. Do I feel the need to suicide bomb their project? No. Its your call. Its your funeral. When I have proof that my way is The One True Way and yours is a sham, you can damn well bet I’ll be force feeding it to you. But given that ain’t gonna happen: I think we’re all pretty safe. If you don’t wanna pair, you put your headphones on and disappear into your silent reverie. Those of us that like pairing will pair, those of us that don’t, won’t. I’m fine with that.

The trouble is, in this farcical echo chamber of an industry, where the lessons of 40 years ago still haven’t been learnt properly. Where we keep repeating the mistakes of 20 years ago. Of 10 years ago. Of 5 years ago. Of 2 years ago. Of last week. For Christ’s sake people, can we not just learn a little of what’s gone before? All we have is mindless opinion, presented as fact. Everyone’s out to flog you their new shiny products, or whatever bullshit service they’re offering this week. No, sorry, it’s all utter bollocks. We know less about building decent software now than we did 40 years ago. It’s just now we build a massive amount more of it. And it’s even more shit than it ever was. Only now, now we have those crazy bastards that otherwise would stand on street corners telling me that Jesus would save me if only I would let him; but now they’re selling me scrum master training or some other snake oil.

All of this is unfortunately entirely indistinguishable from reasoned debate, so for youngsters entering the industry they have no way to know that its just a bunch of wankers arguing which colour to paint this new square wheel they invented. Until after a few years they become as jaded and cynical as the rest of us and decide to take advantage of all the other dumb fools out there. They find their little niche, their little way of making the world a little bit worse but themselves a little bit richer. And so the cycle repeats. Fashion begets fashion. Opinion begets opinion.

There aren’t any right answers in creating software. I know what I’ve found works some of the time. I get paid to put into practice what I know. I hope you do, too. But we’ve all had a different set of experiences which means we often don’t agree on what works and what doesn’t. But this is all we have. The plural of anecdote is not data.

All we have is individual judgement, borne out of individual experience. There is no grand unified theory of Correct Software Development. The best we can hope to do is learn from each other and try as many different approaches as possible. Try and fail safely and often. The more techniques you’ve tried the better the chance you can find the right technique at the right time.

Call it craftsmanship if you like. Call it art if you like. But it certainly isn’t science. And I don’t know about you, but it’s a very long time since I saw any engineering round these parts.

The future’s software: the future’s shit

Software is taking over the world. Arguably software has already taken over the world. The trouble is: software is all shit – and it’s all your fault.

I had one of those seconds-from-flinging-something-heavy-through-my-tv days yesterday: I really have had it with crappy software. First, I decided to relax and catch up with last week’s Have I Got News For You on BBC iPlayer. Unfortunately, for some unfathomable reason, the XBox iPlayer app has become shit in recent months. Last night, it played 0.5 seconds of the show and hung. Network traffic was still flying by, but none of it was appearing on my TV. Fine, I switched to using iPlayer on my laptop – at least that normally works.

Afterwards I decided to watch another of the (excellent, by the way) American remake of House of Cards on Netflix. First, my router had got its knickers in a twist and switched the VPN so Netflix thought I was in the US, so all of my recently watched had disappeared. Boot up laptop (again), login to admin page on the router, fiddle with settings, reboot, reboot XBox, login again: there we go, UK Netflix is back, I can finally watch House of Cards. Except now the TV has crashed and refuses to decode the HDCP signal from the XBox. Reboot TV: no. Reboot xbox, again. Yes! We have signal!

I sat back and started watching. I have to get up, three times, because the volume is quieter than a quiet thing on quiet day in quiet land. Eventually it was so damned quiet I manage to miss some dialog, so I get to use the, occasionally awesome, XBox kinect voice control feature that saves me scrabbling to find the controller: “xbox rewind”. Excellent, it starts rewinding. “xbox stop”. “XBOX, STOP!” “Oh for fuck’s fucking sake xbox, fucking stop you fucking retarded demon, STOP!”. Find the controller. Wait for it to boot up. Now the Netflix app has resumed its entirely random bug where I lose all the on screen navigation controls, so I have to guess which combination of up, down, A, A, B, up, down stops the bloody rewind and not the one that invokes the super Netflix boss level. Eventually the button mashing exits Netflix, not what I intended but at least it’s stopped rewinding. I launch Netflix again. This time the on screen controls work. Woohoo! Now volume has switched back to slightly louder than a jet engine piped directly against your ear drum, so I jump up and turn the volume down before it wakes my little boy up.

By now, I’m in no mood for political intrigue – killing every developer that was involved in any of the pieces of software that have ruined my mood and my evening, quite gladly: pass me the knife, I’m happy to relieve each them of their useless lives and hopelessly misapplied careers.

The trouble is: it’s not their fault. All software is shit. As software takes over more and more of my life I realise: it’s not getting any better. My phone crashes, my TV crashes, my hi-fi crashes. My sat nav gets lost and my car needs a BIOS upgrade. This is all before I get to work and get to use any actual computers. Actual computers that I actually hate.

Every step of every day, software is pissing me off. And you know what? It’s only going to get worse. As software invades more and more of our lives our complete inability to create decent, stable software is becoming a plague. The future will be dominated by people swearing at every little computer they come into contact with. In our bright software future where everything is digital and we’re constantly plugged into the metaverse I will spend my entire life swearing at it for being so unutterably, unnecessarily shit.

You know what else? As software developers: it’s all our fault.