How many builds?

I’m always amazed at the seemingly high pain threshold .net developers have when it comes to tooling. I’ve written before about the poor state of tooling in .net, but just recently I hit another example of poor tooling that infuriates me: I have too many builds, and they don’t agree whether my code compiles.

One of the first things that struck me when starting to develop on .net was that compiling code was still a thing. An actual step that had to be thought about. Incremental compilers in Eclipse and the like have been around for ages – to the point where, generally, Java developers don’t actually have to instruct their IDE to compile code for them. But in Visual Studio? Oh it’s definitely necessary. And time consuming. Oh my god is it slow. Ok, maybe not as slow as Scala. But still unbelievably slow when you’re used to working at the speed of thought.

Another consequence of the closed, Microsoft way of doing things is that tools can’t share the compiler’s work. So ReSharper have implemented their own compiler, effectively. It incrementally parses source code and finds compiler errors. Sometimes it even agrees with the Visual Studio build. But all too often it doesn’t. From the spurious not-actually-an-error that I have to continually instruct ReSharper to ignore; to the warnings-as-errors build failures that ReSharper doesn’t warn me about; to the random why-does-ReSharper-not-know-about-that-NuGet-package-errors.

This can be infuriating when refactoring. E.g. if an automated refactor leaves a variable unused, I will now have a compiler warning; since all my projects run with warnings-as-errors switched on, this will fail the build. But ReSharper doesn’t know that. So I apply the refactoring, code & tests are green: commit. Push. Boom! CI is red. But it was an automated refactor for chrissakes, how’ve I broken the build?!

I also use NCrunch, an automated test runner for Visual Studio (like Infinitest in the Java world). NCrunch is awesome, by the way; better even than the continuous test runner in ReSharper 10. If you’ve never used a continuous test runner and think you’re doing TDD, sort your life out and setup Infinitest or NCrunch. It doesn’t just automate pressing the shortcut key to run all your tests. Well, actually that is exactly what it does – but the impact it has on your workflow is so much more than that. When you can type a few characters, look at the test output and see what happened you get instant feedback. This difference in degree changes the way you write code and makes it so much easier to do TDD.

Anyway I digress – NCrunch, because Microsoft, can’t use the result of the compile that Visual Studio does. So it does its own. It launches MSBuild in the background, continually re-compiling your code. This is not exactly kind on your CPU. It also introduces inconsistencies. Because NCrunch is running a slightly different MSBuild on each project to the build VisualStudio does you get subtly different results sometimes; which is different again from ReSharper with its own compiler that isn’t even using MSBuild. I now have three builds. Three compilers. It is honestly a miracle when they all agree that my code compiles.

An all-too-typical dev cycle becomes:

  • Write test
  • ReSharper is happy
  • NCrunch build is failing, force reload NCrunch project
  • NCrunch builds, test fails
  • Make test pass
  • Try to run app
  • VisualStudio build fails
  • Fix NuGet problems
  • NCrunch build is now failing
  • Force NCrunch to reload at least one project again
  • Force VisualStudio to rebuild the project
  • Then the solution
  • Run app to sanity check change
  • ReSharper now shows error
  • Re-ignore perennial ReSharper non-error
  • All three compilers agree, quick: commit!

Normally then the build fails in CI because I still screwed up the NuGet packages.

Then recently, as if this wasn’t already one of the outer circles of hell. The CI build was failing for a bizarre reason. We have a command line script which applies the same build steps that CI runs, so I thought I’d run that to replicate the problem. Unfortunately the command line build was failing on my machine for a spectacularly spurious reason that was different again than the failure in CI. Great. I now have five builds which don’t all agree on whether my code compiles.

Do you really hate computers? Do you wish you had more reasons to defenestrate every last one of them? Have you considered a career in software development?

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